Printable List
1.
Soul of a Citizen: Living with Conviction in Challenging Times

Soul of a Citizen: Living with Conviction in Challenging Times

by Paul Rogat Loeb

"Soul of a Citizen" has become a classic handbook for budding social activists, veteran organizers, and anybody who wants to make a change. America's new president has asked citizens to get involved in their communities, and this book shows how to get started.

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2.
Stars in Their Courses: The Gettysburg Campaign, June-July 1963

Stars in Their Courses: The Gettysburg Campaign, June-July 1863

by Shelby Foote

Shelby Foote's monumental three-part chronicle of the Civil War was hailed by Walker Percy as "an unparalleled achievement, an American Iliad, a unique work uniting the scholarship of the historian and the high readability of the first-class novelist."

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3.
The Killer Angels

The Killer Angels

by Michael Shaara

In the four most bloody and courageous days of our nation's history, two armies fought for two dreams. One dreamed of freedom, the other of a way of life.

Far more than rifles and bullets were carried into battle. There were memories. There were promises. There was love. And far more than men fell on those Pennsylvania fields. Shattered futures, forgotten innocence, and crippled beauty were also the casualties of war.

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4.
crime and punishment

Crime and Punishment

by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

Through the story of the brilliant but conflicted young Raskolnikov and the murder he commits, Fyodor Dostoevsky explores the theme of redemption through suffering. Crime and Punishment put Dostoevsky at the forefront of Russian writers when it appeared in 1866 and is now one of the most famous and influential novels in world literature.

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5.
He, She and It

He, She and It

by Marge Piercy

"A triumph of the imagination. Rich, complex, impossible to put down." Alice Hoffman In the middle of the twenty-first century, life as we know it has changed for all time. Shira Shipman's marriage has broken up, and her young son has been taken from her by the corporation that runs her zone, so she has returned to Tikva, the Jewish free town where she grew up. There, she is welcomed by Malkah, the brilliant grandmother who raised her, and meets an extraordinary man who is not a man at all, but a unique cyborg implanted with intelligence, emotions—and the ability to kill.

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6.
The frugal superpower : America's global leadership in a cash-strapped era

The Frugal Superpower : America's Global Leadership in a Cash-Strapped Era

by Michael Mandelbaum

In this incisive new book, Michael Mandelbaum argues that the era marked by an expansive American foreign policy is coming to an end. During the seven decades from the U.S. entry into World War II in 1941 to the present, economic constraints rarely limited what the United States did in the world. Now that will change. The country's soaring deficits, fueled by the huge costs of the financial crash and of its entitlement programs-Social Security and Medicare-will compel a more modest American international presence.

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7.
Why the West Rules—for Now: The Patterns of History, and What They Reveal About the Future

Why the West Rules—for Now: The Patterns of History, and What They Reveal About the Future

by Ian Morris

Sometime around 1750, English entrepreneurs unleashed the astounding energies of steam and coal, and the world was forever changed. The emergence of factories, railroads, and gunboats propelled the West’s rise to power in the nineteenth century, and the development of computers and nuclear weapons in the twentieth century secured its global supremacy. Now, at the beginning of the twenty-first century, many worry that the emerging economic power of China and India spells the end of the West as a superpower. In order to understand this possibility, we need to look back in time. Why has the West dominated the globe for the past two hundred years, and will its power last?

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8.
Through the Language Glass: Why the World Looks Different in Other Languages

Through the Language Glass: Why the World Looks Different in Other Languages

by Guy Deutscher

A masterpiece of linguistics scholarship, at once erudite and entertaining, confronts the thorny question of how—and whether—culture shapes language and language, culture. Linguistics has long shied away from claiming any link between a language and the culture of its speakers: too much simplistic (even bigoted) chatter about the romance of Italian and the goose-stepping orderliness of German has made serious thinkers wary of the entire subject.

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9.
Bread Givers: A Novel: A Struggle Between a Father of the Old World and a Daughter of the New

Bread Givers: A Novel: A Struggle Between a Father of the Old World and a Daughter of the New

by Anzia Yezierska

The classic novel of Jewish immigrants in new trade paperback format and design, with sixteen period photographs. This masterwork of American immigrant literature is set in the 1920s on the Lower East Side of Manhattan and tells the story of Sara Smolinsky, the youngest daughter of an Orthodox rabbi, who rebels against her father's rigid conception of Jewish womanhood. Sarah's struggle towards independence and self-fulfillment resonates with a passion all can share. Beautifully redesigned page for page with the previous editions, Bread Givers is an essential historical work with enduring relevance. 16 b/w photographs.

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10.
Giants in the Earth: A Saga of the Prairie

Giants in the Earth: A Saga of the Prairie

by O. E. Rolvaag

The classic story of a Norwegian pioneer family's struggles with the land and the elements of the Dakota Territory as they try to make a new life in America.

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11.
Nectar in a Sieve

Nectar in a Sieve

by Kamala Markandaya

Named Notable Book of 1955 by the American Library Association, this is the very moving story of a peasant woman in a primitive village in India whose whole life was a gallant and persistent battle to care for those she loved. "Comparable in many ways to Cry, the Beloved Country...if anything...better." (Saturday Evening Post)

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12.
The Good Earth

The Good Earth

by Pearl S. Buck

Wang Lung, rising from humble Chinese farmer to wealthy landowner, gloried in the soil he worked. He held it above his family, even above his gods. But soon, between Wang Lung and the kindly soil that sustained him, came flood and drought, pestilence and revolution....

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13.
The Dark Child

The Dark Child

by Laye Camara

The Dark Child is a distinct and graceful memoir of Camara Laye's youth in the village of Koroussa, French Guinea. Long regarded Africa's preeminent Francophone novelist, Laye (1928-80) herein marvels over his mother's supernatural powers, his father's distinction as the village goldsmith, and his own passage into manhood, which is marked by animistic beliefs and bloody rituals of primeval origin

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14.
The Physician

The Physician

by Noah Gordon

In the 11th century, Rob Cole left poor, disease-ridden London to make his way across the land, hustling, juggling, peddling cures to the sick—and discovering the mystical ways of healing. It was on his travels that he found his own very real gift for healing—a gift that urged him on to become a doctor. So all consuming was his dream, that he made the perilous, unheard-of journey to Persia, to its Arab universities where he would undertake a transformation that would shape his destiny forever.

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15.
The Farming of Bones

The Farming of Bones

by Edwidge Danticat

Memorializing the forgotten victims of ethnic cleansing in Haiti in the 1930s, this novel revolves around a Haitian-born servant girl and her lover, an itinerant sugarcane cutter, as they struggle against the violence.

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16.
Things Fall Apart

Things Fall Apart

by Chinua Achebe

Things Fall Apart tells two overlapping, intertwining stories, both of which center around Okonkwo, a “strong man” of an Ibo village in Nigeria. The first of these stories traces Okonkwo's fall from grace with the tribal world in which he lives, and in its classical purity of line and economical beauty it provides us with a powerful fable about the immemorial conflict between the individual and society.

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17.
Confessions

Confessions

by Bishop of Hippo Saint Augustine

In this new translation by Henry Chadwick of what can only be considered a masterpiece of Western literature, the brilliant and impassioned descriptions of Augustine's colourful early life and search for spiritual satisfaction are accurately conveyed to the English reader. Augustine's work contains many references and allusions that can hardly be understood without background information about the ancient social and intellectual setting. The accompanying notes and introduction to this translation will therefore prove invaluable to the contemporary reader.

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18.
Silent Spring

Silent Spring

by Rachel Carson

First published in 1962, this book was instrumental in launching the environmental movement and spurred changes in laws affecting air, land, and water. A rigorous presentation of the effects of pesticide use.

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19.
Waiting for the Barbarians

Waiting for the Barbarians

by J. M. Coetzee

J. M. Coetzee's prize-winning novel is a startling allegory of the war between opressor and opressed. The Magistrate is not simply a man living through a crisis of conscience in an obscure place in remote times; his situation is that of all men living in unbearable complicity with regimes that ignore justice and decency.

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20.
The Corrections

The Corrections

by Jonathan Franzen

The Corrections is a grandly entertaining novel for the new century-a comic, tragic masterpiece about a family breaking down in an age of easy fixes.

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21.
Civilization and Its Discontents

Civilization and Its Discontents

by Sigmund Freud

"Civilization and Its Discontents may be Sigmund Freud's best-known work. It has been praised, dissected, lambasted, interpreted, and reinterpreted. In this seminal volume of twentieth-century thought, Freud elucidates the contest between aggression, indeed the death drive, and its adversary, eros. He speaks to issues of human creativity and fulfillment, the place of beauty in culture, and the effects of repression." Louis Menand reflects on the importance of this work in intellectual thought and why it has become such a landmark book in the history of ideas.

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22.
The Prince

The Prince

by Niccolò Machiavelli

"The Prince" is the most controversial book about winning power - and holding on to it - ever written. Machiavelli's tough-minded, pragmatic argument that sometimes it is necessary to abandon ethics to succeed made his name notorious. Yet his book has been read by strategists, politicians and business people ever since as the ultimate guide to realpolitik.

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23.
The Complete Essays

The Complete Essays

by Michel de Montaigne

In 1572 Montaigne retired from public life and began the reading and writing which were to develop into "assays" of his thoughts and opinions. Nobody in Western civilization had ever tried to do what Montaigne set out to do. In a vivid, contemporary style he surprises us with entertaining quotations; he moves swiftly from thought to thought, often digressing from an idea only to return to it triumphantly, having caught up with it elsewhere, and in so doing leads the reader along the criss-cross paths of a journey of discovery. Montaigne set out to discover himself. What he discovered instead was the human race.

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24.
The God of Small Things

The God of Small Things

by Arundhati Roy

In her first novel, award-winning Indian screenwriter Arundhati Roy conjures a whoosh of wordplay that rises from the pages like a brilliant jazz improvisation. The God of Small Things is nominally the story of young twins Rahel and Estha and the rest of their family, but the book feels like a million stories spinning out indefinitely; it is the product of a genius child-mind that takes everything in and transforms it in an alchemy of poetry. The God of Small Things is at once exotic and familiar to the Western reader, written in an English that's completely new and invigorated by the Asian Indian influences of culture and language.

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25.
The Tempest

The Tempest

by William Shakespeare

The Tempest is a play by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written in 1610–11, and thought by many critics to be the last play that Shakespeare wrote alone.

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26.
Walden

Walden

by Henry David Thoreau

Thoreau's literary classic, an elegantly written record of his experiment in simple living, has engaged readers and thinkers for a century and a half. This edition of Walden is the first to set forth an authoritative text with generous annotations. Thoreau scholar Jeffrey S. Cramer has meticulously corrected errors and omissions from previous editions of Walden and here provides illuminating notes on the biographical, historical, and geographical contexts of Thoreau s life.

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27.
Democracy in America

Democracy in America

by Alexis de Tocqueville

From America's call for a free press to its embrace of the capitalist system, Democracy in America -- first published in 1835 -- enlightens, entertains, and endures as a brilliant study of our national government and character. Philosopher John Stuart Mill called it "among the most remarkable productions of our time." Woodrow Wilson wrote that de Tocqueville's ability to illuminate the actual workings of American democracy was "possibly without rival."

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28.
The Aeneid

The Aeneid

by Virgil

Virgil's great epic transforms the Homeric tradition into a triumphal statement of the Roman civilizing mission. Translated by Robert Fitzgerald.

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29.
Zeitoun

Zeitoun

by Dave Eggers

In August, 2005, as Hurricane Katrina blew in, the city of New Orleans had been abandoned by most citizens. But resident Abdulrahman Zeitoun, though his wife and family had gone, refused to leave. For days he traversed an apocalyptic landscape of flooded streets by canoe. He protected neighbours' properties, fed trapped dogs and rescued survivors. But eventually he came to the attention of those 'guarding' this drowned city. Only then did Zeitoun's nightmare really begin. "Zeitoun" is the powerful, ultimately uplifting true story of one man's courage when confronted with an awesome force of nature followed by more troubling human oppression.

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30.
Farm hands: Hard Work and Hard Lessons from Western New York fields

Farm hands: Hard Work and Hard Lessons from Western New York fields

by Tom Rivers

Farm Hands: Hard work and hard lessons from Western New York fields is based on a 2008 newspaper series in The (Batavia) Daily News. The 168-page book highlights 13 farms in Orleans and Genesee counties and shows the grueling work required to plant and harvest crops. It is now in its fifth printing.

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31.
Ecotopia: The Notebooks and Reports of William Weston

Ecotopia: The Notebooks and Reports of William Weston

by Ernest Callenbach

A novel both timely and prophetic, Ernest Callenbach’s Ecotopia is a hopeful antidote to the environmental concerns of today, set in an ecologically sound future society. Hailed by the Los Angeles Times as the “newest name after Wells, Verne, Huxley, and Orwell,” Callenbach offers a visionary blueprint for the survival of our planet...and our future.

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32.
Ain't No makin' it: Aspirations and Attainment in a Low-Income Neighborhood

Ain't No makin' it: Aspirations and Attainment in a Low-Income Neighborhood

by Jay MacLeod

With the original 1987 publication of Ain't No Makin' It Jay MacLeod brought us to the Clarendon Heights housing project where we met the "Brothers" and "Hallway Hangers." Their story of poverty, race, and defeatism moved readers and challenged ethnic stereotypes. MacLeod's return eight years later, and the resulting 1995 revision, revealed little improvement in the lives of these men as they struggled in the labor market and crime-ridden underground economy.

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33.
The Tipping Point

The Tipping Point

by Malcolm Gladwell

New Yorker writer Malcolm Gladwell looks at why major changes in our society so often happen suddenly and unexpectedly. Ideas, behavior, messages, and products, he argues, often spread like outbreaks of infectious disease. Just as a single sick person can start an epidemic of the flu, so too can a few fare-beaters and graffiti artists fuel a subway crime wave, or a satisfied customer fill the empty tables of a new restaurant.

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34.
The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism

The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism

by Naomi Klein

What do Milton Friedman, Augusto Pinochet, and Iraq have in common? Naomi Klein offers a defiantly partisan deconstruction of Friedman's Chicago School of economics and its open embrace of natural and manmade crises (e.g., Hurricane Katrina, coups in Chile and other South American countries in the '70s and '80s, Russia's communist implosion in the '90s, the U.S. occupation of Iraq) as key opportunities for its accolytes to swoop in, jolt a dazed populace with free market shock therapy, and quickly consolidate power while crushing dissent. If her reach seems sometimes to exceed her grasp -- she finds the electrical torture devices used by the juntas advised by Friedman's "Chicago Boys" a natural outgrowth of the advisers' economic shock doctrine -- she succeeds in showing how, in the age of globalization, free market precepts are being appropriated to build corporatist oligarchies that ride roughshod over our most cherished democratic ideals.

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35.
The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

by Rebecca Skloot

Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor Southern tobacco farmer, yet her cells--taken without her knowledge--became one of the most important tools in medicine. The first "immortal" human cells grown in culture, they are still alive today, though she has been dead for more than sixty years. HeLa cells were vital for developing the polio vaccine; uncovered secrets of cancer and viruses; helped lead to in vitro fertilization, cloning, and gene mapping; and have been bought and sold by the billions. Yet Henrietta Lacks is buried in an unmarked grave. Her family did not learn of her "immortality" until more than twenty years after her death, when scientists began using her husband and children in research without informed consent. The story of the Lacks family is inextricably connected to the dark history of experimentation on African Americans, the birth of bioethics, and the legal battles over whether we control the stuff we are made of--From publisher description.

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36.
Darkness Spoken: Collected Poems of Ingeborg Bachmann

Darkness Spoken: Collected Poems of Ingeborg Bachmann

by Ingeborg Bachmann

Greatly expanded bilingual edition of the 1994 Marsilio edition, Songs in Flight.

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37.
A Dog's Purpose

A Dog's Purpose

by W. Bruce Cameron

This is the remarkable story of one endearing dog's search for his purpose over the course of several lives. More than just another charming dog story, this touches on the universal quest for an answer to life's most basic question: Why are we here? Surprised to find himself reborn as a rambunctious golden haired puppy after a tragically short life as a stray mutt, Bailey's search for his new life's meaning leads him into the loving arms of 8 year old Ethan. During their countless adventures Bailey joyously discovers how to be a good dog. But this life as a beloved family pet is not the end of Bailey's journey. Reborn as a puppy yet again, Bailey wonders, will he ever find his purpose? Heartwarming, insightful, and often laugh out loud funny, this book is not only the emotional and hilarious story of a dog's many lives, but also a dog's eye commentary on human relationships and the unbreakable bonds between man and man's best friend. This story teaches us that love never dies, that our true friends are always with us, and that every creature on earth is born with a purpose.

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38.
Eating Fire: Selected Poetry 1965-1995

Eating Fire: Selected Poetry 1965-1995

by Margaret Atwood

An omnibus edition of three collections of poems by Margaret Atwood: Poems 1965-1975, Poems 1976-1986, and Morning in the Burned House. Through bus trips and postcards, wilderness and trivia, she reflects the passion and energy of a writer intensely engaged with her craft and the world.

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39.
Madame Curie, A Biography

Madame Curie, A Biography

by Eve Curie

The professional triumphs and personal struggles of a pioneering woman scientist.

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40.
Eating Animals

Eating Animals

by Jonathan Safran Foer

Brilliantly synthesizing philosophy, literature, science, memoir and his own detective work, "Eating Animals" explores the many fictions we use to justify our eating habits--from folklore to pop culture to family traditions and national myth--and how such tales can lull us into a brutal forgetting.

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41.
Waiting for Godot

Waiting for Godot

by Samuel Beckett

Seminal work of twentieth century drama, Waiting for Godot was Samuel Beckett's first professionally produced play. It opened in Paris in 1953 at the tiny Left Bank Theatre de Babylone, and has since become a cornerstone of twentieth-century theater.

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42.
The Affluent Society

The Affluent Society

by John Kenneth Galbraith

'A compelling challenge to conventional thought' - "New York Times". In this newly updated edition of his classic text on the "economics of abundance", Galbraith lays bare the hazards of individual and social complacency about economic inequality. It is as relevant now, with the ever-widening gap between rich and poor, as when it was first published 40 years ago. Galbraith challenges why we worship work and productivity when so many of the goods we produce are superfluous, and why we grudge spending on public works while ignoring extravagance in the private sector. "The Affluent Society" exemplifies Galbraith's wit, clarity and eloquence of prose.

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43.
The Snow Leopard

The Snow Leopard

by Peter Matthiessen

When Matthiessen went to Nepal to study the Himalayan blue sheep and, possibly, to glimpse the rare and beautiful snow leopard, he undertook his five-week trek as winter snows were sweeping into the high passes. This is a radiant and deeply moving account of a "true pilgrimage, a journey of the heart."

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44.
The Beautyful Ones Are Not Yet Born

The Beautyful Ones Are Not Yet Born

by Ayi Kwei Armah

A railway freight clerk in Ghana attempts to hold out against the pressures that impel him toward corruption in both his family and his country.

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45.
Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman! Adventures of a Curious Character

Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman! Adventures of a Curious Character

by Richard Phillips Feynman

Richard Feynman (1918-1988), winner of the Nobel Prize in physics, thrived on outrageous adventures. Here he recounts in his inimitable voice his experience trading ideas on atomic physics with Einstein and Bohr and ideas on gambling with Nick the Greek; cracking the uncrackable safes guarding the most deeply held nuclear secrets; painting a naked female toreador - and much else of an eyebrow-raising nature. In short, here is Feynman's life in all its eccentric glory - a combustible mixture of high intelligence, unlimited curiosity, and raging chutzpah.

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46.
The Hour of the Star

The Hour of the Star

by Clarice Lispector

Clarice Lispector died of cancer at the age of fifty-six on 9th December 1977. "The Hour of the Star" was published that same year and acclaimed by the critics as 'a regional allegory' of extraordinary awareness and insight. Lispector herself defined "The Hour of the Star" as a book 'made without words...a mute photograph...a silence...a question'. The tale of Macabea can be read at different levels and lends itself to various interpretations. The book's subtle interplay of fiction and philosophy sums up Lispector's unique talent as a writer and her lasting influence on contemporary Brazilian writing.

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47.
Austerlitz

Austerlitz

by Winfried Georg Sebald

WG Sebald's Austerlitz has something of the fractured narrative and wanderlust of his novels The Emigrants and The Rings of Saturn, and continues to develop their obsession with history, loss and memory--or more precisely in this case, forgetting. In the decade since the original German publication of Vertigo, Sebald has established himself as indisputably one of Europe's most interesting and lauded writers.

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48.
The Death of Woman Wang

The Death of Woman Wang

by Jonathan D. Spence

Drawing on local Chinese histories, the memoirs of scholars, and other contemporary writings, Chinese historian Jonathan Spence reconstructs an extraordinary tale of rural tragedy in a remote corner of Shantung province in 17th-century China. Life in the county of T'an-ch'eng emerges as an endless cycle of floods, plagues, crop failures, banditry, and heavy taxation. Against this turbulent background a tenacious tax collector, an irascible farmer, and an unhappy wife act out a poignant drama at whose climax the wife, having run away from her husband, returns to him, only to die at his hands.

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