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University at Buffalo Libraries

University Archives

Student Activities


Compare 65 years of student clubs and organizations gathered from the Iris and Buffalonian yearbooks.

Because it has always been relatively easy to start a student organization, and because most students are only at the University for four years, there has always been a high turnover when it comes to student organizations.

Take a look at the student organizations listed in the yearbooks for the following years: 1925, 1945, 1965, 1985. This is just a snap shot to give you an idea of how things change over time. You will see how clubs come and go and notice a few organizations with staying power.



1925 | 1945 | 1965 | 1985

1925

Academic and Professional Societies


Barrettonian Society

The Barrettonian Society takes its name from W.C. Barrett, MD, DDS, the first dean and professor of the dental school.

It was founded in December of 1893 in order that "a broader knowledge of the science of dentistry would be made possible by cooperative methods of the students, faculty, and others of high esteem in their profession."

The Barrettonian logo from the 1921 Iris yearbook

The officers of the Barrettonian Society, 1921.


The James A. Gibson Anatomical Society


Athletics


Block "B" Club

The Block "B" Club, organized in 1924, was composed of all male students of the University who had earned their major letter in one of the varsity sports. It was the first organization of letter men in the University. The paramount objective of the organization was:

  1. To bring the athletes closer together in outside activities, as well as on campus
  2. To promote the University's athletic program
  3. To advocate conduct of members befitting the integrity of the University of Buffalo

-- from the 1955 Buffalonian yearbook

Block "B" Club, 1925


Honor Societies


Bison Head

Bison Head was a senior men's honor society established in 1923.

"Bisonhead, almost as old as the University itself, signifies the ultimate honor which the University of Buffalo can bestow upon its outstanding male students. The wearer of the blue ribbon and gold key is a distinguished member of an honorable group - a credit to himself, his University, and his community."

(1960 Buffalonian)

Click on the 1923 Constitution of Bison Head to see a larger image.


Cap and Gown

"Cap and Gown honors those women who honor the University. Cap and Gown is the Senior Women’s honorary society which gives recognition to those women students in the University of Buffalo who during their college course, have been most influential in promoting the highest ideals of college life, and unites these women in an organization which will strive for a still further realization of these ideals in the University of Buffalo. Election to the society is based upon traits of personality, undergraduate activities, and scholarship, and is the highest honor that can be bestowed upon a University of Buffalo woman student."

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From Cap and Gown Scrapbook (1924-1963) compiled by Susanne Griffiths Te’Katch and Carol Ann Templeton


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Members, Class of 1956
Left to Right: Karen Krull, Marilyn Culkowski, Maryann Saccomando, Frances Perkowski


Leadership and Governance

Students Activities Committee, Student Section


Music and Performance

The Clef Dwellers


Glee Club
(includes Men's Glee Club and Women's Glee Club)

The first Glee Club was organized in 1898 by Frank L. Purdy and continued to perform productively until its last concert in 1907. "From 1907 to 1913 [however] music seemed to be a lost art as far as the University of Buffalo was concerned. In 1913 A. Bert Lemon, a student in the Pharmacy Department, attempted to revive the Glee Club. […] Lack of interest continued until 1919 when Dr. Lemon, still on the warpath, captured the interest of Richard Durrett, a war-time song leader in the YMCA service. Through constant effort, after much hard work and not a little discouragement, Mr. Durrett finally assembled a Glee Club and Orchestra and presented them in concert in 1920" (The Alumni News, April 28, 1927). The Girl’s Glee Club was envisioned as a separate entity from the Men’s Glee Club in the mid-1920s.

Men's Glee Club pictured in the 1927 Iris yearbook

Girl's Glee Club pictured in the 1927 Iris yearbook

Quartette

The Varsity Band


Publications


The Iris Yearbook

The Iris was the University’s original yearbook. It was first published in 1898 and continued publication (with a brief hiatus from 1908-1919) until 1932 when the Buffalonian became the schools official yearbook.

In 1976, the Iris was resurrected by the students of the medical school to serve as their school yearbook. The publication of the medical school’s Iris continues to this day.

Iris staff board yearbook photo, 1927

The 1904 Iris Yearbook

Cover of the 1904 yearbook photo

Iris staff board poses eating bowls of mush for sustenance in their 1904 yearbook photo


The Bee

The Bee was, in its time, the "official student publication of the University of Buffalo." From 1921 until 1950, it filled the role that The Spectrum does today.

The Bee Staff, 1931


Student newspapers at UB

In 1947 just after World War II, a small group of students broke off from The Bee in order to publish a more conscious-minded student newspaper. Claiming that The Bee did nothing to report on what was happening outside of the University, the new newspaper, called The Argus, set out with a wider perspective commenting on national and international events. The two student publications, both funded by the University, were at odds and often resulted to slinging insults back and forth. As a result of the conflict the two were told in 1950 to merge forming one student newspaper with "the journalistic quality of The Argus with the efficient business staff of The Bee."

The new publication, named The Spectrum, was granted a $1000 budget. It ran weekly until 1966 when it began publishing editions twice weekly. In January 1969 they received computer equiptment and began publishing three times a week. Read the online current edition of The Spectrum

-- information from dimension a supplement to The Spectrum vol 20, no 11 September 28, 1970


Bison

Bison was a humorous magazine published from 1930-1932.

Bison staff from the 1921 Iris yearbook

Bison cover: volume 18, May 1930


Special Interests

Chess Team

Debating Team


1945

Academic and Professional Societies

International Relations Club

Athletics

Intermural Athletics

WAA (Women's Athletic Association)

Cultural

Inter-American Youth

Leadership and Governance


Junior Prom

Junior Prom was one of the most festive affairs held annually by the University of Buffalo. During the event, the Prom Queen, chosen through a popular election, was crowned. Bison Head then tapped new members from the Junior men of the University who were outstanding during the year. Provided that the dance was a success, the Board of Managers Scholarship was awarded to a Junior or a Senior who had been active in extra curricular activities. It was customary to procure a big-name band for the occasion.

-- from the 1948-1949 Student Handbook

The 1945 Junior Prom Committee posing for the Buffalonian.

Dancing, c. 1950s

Dancing at the Junior Prom

Band, 1937

1943 Junior prom announcement


Norton Union Board of Managers


The Panhellenic Council

The Panhellenic Council is the governing body for social sororities on the University campus.

"Composed of a junior and senior delegate from each sorority, the Council governed the bi-annual rushing periods and promotes activities under direction of Leadership, Scholarship, Housing, Culture and Philanthropic Chairmen."

(1957 Buffalonian)


Students Activities Committee

Music and Performance


Blue Masquers Dramatic Society

The Blue Masquers Dramatic Society was a large part of the University's community from the 1920s until the mid 1950s. They were a student organization that concerned themselves with the production of experimental plays. New members entered the organization as "White Masquers" and had to spend many hours in the workroom and on committees until they could fulfill the requirements to become a "Blue Masquer."

The Blue Masquers were known for their semi-annual productions which they directed, produced and acted in. They also were in charge of costumes, stage sets and publicity for each play.

Stills from Blue Masquers' productions in the 1932 Iris yearbook


Glee Club
(includes Men's Glee Club and Women's Glee Club)

The first Glee Club was organized in 1898 by Frank L. Purdy and continued to perform productively until its last concert in 1907. "From 1907 to 1913 [however] music seemed to be a lost art as far as the University of Buffalo was concerned. In 1913 A. Bert Lemon, a student in the Pharmacy Department, attempted to revive the Glee Club. […] Lack of interest continued until 1919 when Dr. Lemon, still on the warpath, captured the interest of Richard Durrett, a war-time song leader in the YMCA service. Through constant effort, after much hard work and not a little discouragement, Mr. Durrett finally assembled a Glee Club and Orchestra and presented them in concert in 1920" (The Alumni News, April 28, 1927). The Girl’s Glee Club was envisioned as a separate entity from the Men’s Glee Club in the mid-1920s.

Men's Glee Club pictured in the 1927 Iris yearbook

Girl's Glee Club pictured in the 1927 Iris yearbook


UB Orchestra

Patriotic


Women's Organized War Services

"The WOWS, or the Women's Organized War Services, was a new organization on campus this year, created to meet the demands of the trying period through which we are all now living. Under the direction of the steering committee made up of capable women leaders, each woman on campus was registered for some field of the work undertaken.

"The varied and important jobs done by the WOWS have included Red Cross knitting, the making of surgical dressings, Canteen Training, Nursery School Training, USO work, a drive for collecting silk and nylon stockings, and many others vital to furthering the war effort in the city and the nation.

"One of the things our women did which contributed immediately to the morale of our men in service was the dance given for the Aviation Cadets stationed at the University of Buffalo."

(1943 Buffalonian)


Women’s Organized War Services group, 1945
First row: Muriel Hintermeier, Marjorie Egan
Second row: Carol Blackman, Mary Palumbo, Arletta Barrie, Bernice Yasinow, Alyse Hample
Third row: Penelope Montfort, Jean Horton, Margery Schleuse, Evelyn Adams, Vera Stone


Veterans Club

Publications

The Bee


Buffalonian

The Buffalonian is the University’s yearbook. Taking over from The Iris in 1934, it was published annually until 2001. Originally the yearbook for all of the University’s students, in later years it focused on undergraduate students only when the graduate and professional school started publishing their own yearbooks.


The 1969 Buffalonian


Religious

American Orthodox Catholic Alliance

Newman Club


1965

Academic and Professional Societies

American Society of Civil Engineers

American Society of Mechanical Engineers

Engineering Student Councils

Industrial Relations Research Association

Social Welfare Club

Occupational Therapy Club

Psychology Club

Mathematics Club

Accounting Club

Athletic


Schussmeisters Ski Club

http://www.schussmeisters.com/

Organized in 1960 and still in existence today, Schussmeisters Ski Club is one of the largest ski clubs in the country.


Schussmeisters Ski Club, 1962
Bill Cass, Anne Gerban, Carl Malinak, Barbara Shapiro, Howard Atterbach, Barbara Cowan, Anne Magnus, Joan Fleckel, Judy Dorschel, Linda Coen, Sue Schoenberger, Steve Gottesman, Gene Schneller


Cultural

International Club

Honor Societies

Bison Head

Cap and Gown

Leadership and Governance


Inter Fraternity Council

The Inter Fraternity Council (IFC), in its earlier days, was the integrating body guiding all the fraternities at the University. Its purpose was "to maintain high standards of fraternity life and inter-fraternity relationships, and to cooperate with the University authorities in their effort to maintain the highest social and scholastic standards."

The IFC still exists today and acts as the governing body for the social fraternities on the University campus.


Inter Fraternity Council, 1963
First row: R. Lohr, G. Brown, F. Alessi, L. Hankin, P. Greenlaw
Second row: M. Shapiro, R. Helenbrook, J. Glaser, D. Mauer, T. Rothman, S. Bard, J. Fincher
Third row: R. Zack, G. Hiller, J. Titus, W. Rozen, A. Falk, D. Smith, D. Prior, G. Ridley


Inter Fraternity Council Prayer (1960s)

Bless us, O God, not only for the good deeds we do, but for the good deeds we plan to do.

Bless us, O God, not only for the kind words we say, but for the kind words we plan to say!

Make each of us, O God, worthy to stand in Thy sight, and to labor beside each other.

For the University which strengthens our minds, for the fraternity system which unites us, and

For the faith which helps guide us, we thank Thee, our God and our Father.

Amen!


Inter Resident Council

Panhellenic Council

Student Association

Student Senate

Student Judiciary

Student Parking Court

Student Executive Council (School of Nursing)

Union Board

Music and Performance

Men's Glee Club

Women's Chorale

Publications

Publications Board

Buffalonian

The New Student Review


The Spectrum

The Spectrum is the "official student publication" of the University at Buffalo. It began publication in 1950 (taking over from The Bee) and continues to be published today.


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The Spectrum Staff, 1960

Row one: Trudi Genco, Jack Grizzard, Bernie Karp
Row two: Nancy Gorman, Judy Hahn, Marilyn Kanczak, Karen Brand
Row three: Jack Freedman, Barbara Cohn, Marc Lower, Ellen Schwartz
Row four: Richard Mardirosian, Edward Brandt

eric Steese, Spectrum columnist

Eric Steese who wrote the politically charged column "The grump" during the early 1970s


WBFO

Religious

Hillel

Newman Apostolate

Special Interests

Arnold Air Society

Angel Flight

Bridge Club

Debate Club

Photography Club


1985

Academic and Professional Societies

American Society of Civil Engineers

American Society of Mechanical Engineers

Engineering Student Association

Institute of Electrical And Electronic Engineers

National Society of Professional Engineers

Nursing Student Association

Society of Women Engineers

Athletics

Karate Club

Schussmeisters Ski Club

UB Cheerleaders

UB Sailing Club

Cultural


Black Student Union

The Black Student Union became an official student organization in 1968 and still exists today. In 1969, it counted 1,000 members. Its primary concern is uniting the black university community. It sponsors cultural events, like lectures and concerts by black artists, "designed to raise the consciousness of blacks at UB and provide them with some identity and common bonds" (Buffalonian 1983). The BSU is also involved in outreach to the community. In 1969, it started a free breakfast program to provide breakfast to inner city children before school.

During the 1970s, the BSU was very involved in the student protests that were rampant in universities across the county. This came to a head in 1972 when "the Black populace of UB" submitted five demands to President Ketter:

  1. Black Studies be upgraded to departmental status
  2. two black faculty members be reappointed and given tenure
  3. minority faculty members be involved in the tenure review of other minority faculty
  4. minority faculty and students be involved in an ongoing dialogue with academic departments on minority issues
  5. a "privileged communication channel" be established between the president's office and the black contingency

Members of the BSU from the 1983 Buffalonian yearbook


Chinese Student Association

Japanese Student Association


PODER Latinos Unidos

PODER (Puetro Rican Organization for Dignity, Elevation and Responsibility) was started in September of 1968 by a small group of interested and concerned students that felt a need for the Puerto Rican voice to be heard at UB. In Spanish, poder means both "power" and "to be able." These terms reflected the group's main concerns to unite the Puerto Rican population on campus and provide orientation for new Puerto Rican students. Through their planned cultural events, PODER sought to bring about an awareness of Puerto Rican culture and problems to the people of Buffalo.


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Members of PODER in the 1983 Buffalonian yearbook
seated: Maria Martinez, Virginia Acevedo, Laura Gonzalez, Yvette Ortiz, Darmaris Roman
standing: Jose Saurez, Edwin Mojica, Ramon Nieves, Susan Velez


Russian Club

Leadership and Governance

Inter Fraternity Council

Student Association

University Union Activities Board

Publications

Buffalonian

Generation

The Spectrum

TUBE (Televising UB Events)

UB International

Religious

Campus Crusade for Christ

Hillel

Social

Bacchus

Special Interest

UB Flying Association