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New Databases in Support of Materials Science and Engineering

Monday, April 17th, 2017

The UB Libraries are subscribing to a number of new databases that directly support data needs in departments across the university engaged in materials-based research. This growing suite of databases contains data, images, and other non-bibliographic information in support of basic and applied research at UB across many disciplines and departments including medicinal chemistry, pharmaceutical science, protein science, biomaterials, and materials design and innovation. The databases include MSI Eureka, the Cambridge Structural Database, and the ASM Micrograph Database.

  • MSI Eureka is a research and information platform that compiles and critically evaluates data on materials constitution, phase diagrams, crystal structure, etc., for a wide variety of material types and systems. The database covers alloys (steels, bronzes, magnets, electronic materials, and more); non-metals (ceramics, sensors, semiconductors, and more); and composites (cermets and more). In addition to phase diagrams, it contains over 4,000 evaluation reports written by a global team of scientists affiliated with MSI (Materials Science International). The phase diagrams and evaluative reports are linked to bibliographic citations to the literature, which covers the period from 1830 to the present and are drawn from over 250 journals and grey literature that MSIT monitors continuously. There are two ways to access MSI Eureka: Direct, IP-controlled access via the Internet or using the MSI Eureka Viewer (client software). For more information and to connect, got to: and
  • The Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) is the largest repository for small-molecule organic and metal-organic crystal structures, containing over 800,000 entries from x-ray and neutron diffraction analyses. The database is an invaluable tool for chemists, structural biologists, biochemists, pharmaceutical scientists, physicists, and biomedical researchers. Structures can be retrieved by chemical formula, cell parameters, substructures, similarity, and more. 3D structures can be viewed and manipulated. Each structure entry is enriched with bibliographic, chemical and physical property information. For advanced users doing in-depth crystallographic research, CSD provides an extensive suite of downloadable software available only to UB patrons. Download instructions are available at This software provides additional searching and analysis of structures including protein-ligand docking, interaction maps, ensemble studies, cavity comparison, binding site analysis, solid form studies such as packing searches.
  • The ASM Micrograph Database contains more than 4,100 micrographs for industrially important alloys, including ferrous and nonferrous metals, ceramics, and composites, each with details about the material, processing history, specimen preparation, and microstructure. Users can examine images, look for typical or optimal structures, or compare the effects of alloying or heat treating regimes on microstructures. The database designed for anyone who works with materials, from metallography to all branches of engineering. Images include: Material designation and composition; processing history; service history; metallographic preparation/technique; magnification; significance of the structures shown; and selected materials properties data. The database can be searched by material, condition, product form, and image code. Content is updated annually, with an average of 150 new micrographs added to the database each year. To connect, go to: