Skip to Content
ublogo print

University at Buffalo Libraries

Pan-American Exposition of 1901

State, Foreign, and Auxiliary Buildings1


THE FORESTRY BUILDING

Designed by the Exposition Architectural Bureau. —The Forestry Building is situated northwest and adjacent to the Indian Mound, which is conspicuous in the southeastern corner of the Exposition grounds. It was intended to house the forestry exhibit in the south pavilion of the Horticultural Group, now known as the Mines Building, but a change in this plan was necessitated, and a separate structure was erected. The Forestry Building is built of logs in the manner of the settlers' log cabins. It is 150 feet long by 100 feet wide, and presents an interesting contrast with the complex and highly developed examples of architecture in the Main Court.


OHIO STATE BUILDING

A low, gracefully proportioned building, with wide verandas, classic in treatment, designed by John Eisemann, Cleveland, Ohio.


ILLINOIS STATE BUILDING

A combination of the classic and Italian Renaissance styles, designed by J. M. White of Champaign, Illinois.


HONDURAS BUILDING

A pavilion, Spanish in style, with cupola treatment of roof.


CUBAN BUILDING

Spanish Renaissance, with dome, designed by James Ackerman of Buffalo.


CHILE BUILDING

Built of structural steel and closed in with glass, designed by C. I. Williams of Dayton, Ohio.


PORTO RICAN BUILDING

A small pavilion of staff, with beams and ornamental timbers disclosed.


PENNSYLVANIA STATE BUILDING

An attractive structure, colonial in styles, with cupola, designed by the State Superintendent of Grounds and Buildings, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.


NEW ENGLAND STATES BUILDING

This structure, representing the New England States combined, is a type of early New England colonial building, colored to give the effect of red brick and white marble. It was designed by Josephine W. Chapman of Boston, Massachusetts.


GUATEMALAN BUILDING

A square frame structure, classic in treatment.


SANTO DOMINGO BUILDING

A small frame structure, painted in white and cream, designed by C. I. Williams of Dayton, Ohio.


MICHICAN STATE BUILDING

A handsome structure, pure colonial in style, designed by George H. Barbour of Detroit, Michigan.


NEW JERSEY STATE BUILDING

A small structure, Spanish in treatment, designed by A. C. Jenkinson of Newark, New Jersey.


ECUADOR BUILDING

Noticeable by its high gable and Queen Anne style of outline, designed by James & Leo of New York City.


MINNESOTA STATE BUILDING

Spanish Renaissance in treatment, designed by Dudley & Beardsley of Buffalo, New York.


WISCONSIN STATE BUILDING

Classic roof and Gothic treatment of windows and doorways, designed by A. C. Clas of Milwaukee, Wisconsin.


DAKOTA STATE BUILDING

The striking feature of this building is a castellated tower, the remainder of the structure being accorded a Spanish treatment.


MEXICAN BUILDING

An attractive building of Spanish architecture.


KNIGHTS OF THE MACCABEES BUILDING

A small but pleasant structure, Spanish Renaissance in style.


A. O. U. W. BUILDING

Spanish in treatment, with second story open to serve as roof garden.


ORDINANCE BUILDINGS

Spanish in treatment, designed by the United States Government Architectural Bureau, J. Knox Taylor, Superintendent.


DAIRY BUILDING

A reproduction of a Swiss chalet, designed by the Exposition Architectural Bureau.


SERVICE BUILDING

Spanish in style, designed by the Exposition Architectural Bureau.


LARKIN SOAP BUILDING

The main structure is classic in treatment, and is surmounted by a dome in the spirit of the Italian Renaissance, designed by Lansing & Beierl of Buffalo, New York.


References

1. Text quoted directly from the Art Hand-Book, Official Handbook of Architecture and Sculpture and Art Catalogue to the Pan-American Exposition. Ed. David Gray. Buffalo, N.Y.: David Gray, 1901. Sources of the images are noted with each.